Chapter Three – Health and Safety Legislation

Chapter Three – Health and Safety Legislation

Records and Information Required in a Grooming Salon

 

 

Health and Safety at Work

 

Accident Book

Employment Legislation and Safety At Work

Risk Assessment

Fire Risk Assessment

Fire Policy, exit signs, extinguishers

Personal Protective Equipment At Work Regulations (PPE)

Data Sheets of products used (COSHH)

Electricity at Work – PAT (Portable Appliance Testing)

First Aid kit for animals and humans

RIDDOR (Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurences Regulation)

Disability Discrimination Act

Public Liability Insurance

Data Protection

 

 

 

 

Often referred to as HASAW or HSW, this Act of Parliament is the main piece of UK health and safety legislation. It places a duty on all employers “to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare at work” of all their employees.

 

 

Among other provisions, the Act also requires:

  • safe operation and maintenance of the working environment, plant and systems
  • maintenance of safe access and egress to the workplace
  • safe use, handling and storage of dangerous substances
  • adequate training of staff to ensure health and safety
  • adequate welfare provisions for staff at work

Employers must also keep and revise a written record of health and safety policy and consult with employees or their representatives on such policies (this only applies to those employing five or more).

 

 

Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999

 

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 places a duty on employers to assess and manage risks to their employees and others arising from work activities.

Employers must also make arrangements to ensure the health and safety of the workplace, including making arrangements for emergencies, adequate information and training for employees, and for health surveillance where appropriate.

Employees must work safely in accordance with their training and instructions given to them. Employees must also notify the employer or the person responsible for health and safety of any serious or immediate danger to health and safety or any shortcoming in health and safety arrangements.

 

 

A Risk Assessment is a systematic method of looking at work activities, considering what could go wrong, and deciding on suitable control measures to prevent loss, damage or injury in the workplace. The Assessment should include the controls required to eliminate, reduce or minimise the risks.

 

The Health and Safety Executive recommend an approach where you carry out the process in five steps:

1.       identify the hazards associated with work activities

2.       identify who could be harmed by those hazards

3.       Identify how you manage the risks at present and what further steps might be required to reduce the risks further. These are your control measures

4.       record the findings of your assessment and inform those at risk of the controls

5.       review the Risk Assessment on a regular basis, e.g. if the staff, the activity, or the equipment used change

 

Controlling risks

 

When deciding on control measures the following principles should be applied:

can the risk be avoided or eliminated?

  • can the risks be contained at source?
  • can the work be adapted to suit the individual? e.g. layout of workplace, choice of equipment and methods of working
  • can engineering or technical controls be used?  

 

Some examples of common hazards in the grooming salon. There are many more.

 

 

 Hazard Risk Control
Trailing cables Tripping Reroute cables, cable caddies
Water/urine on the floor Slipping Mop up, wet floor signs
Faulty electrical equipment Electrocution, burns PAT testing, remove and repair faulty equipment
Sharp grooming equipment Cuts, stabs Keep dry and stored away
Loud noises Affect hearing, tinnitus Ear defenders
Animal hair and dander in the air Inhalation, impaired vision Masks, goggles
Contact with animals Catch zoonotic diseases, aggression leading to being bitten, allergy to dog hair Gloves, correct restrains, tetanus inoculations
contact with Chemicals, waste disposal Dermatitis, scratches, grazes Gloves

 

 

LONE WORKING RISK ASSESSMENT 

 

 

 

POTENTIAL HAZARD WHO IS AT RISK EXISTING CONTROL MEASURES RISK RATING PREVENTATIVE MEASURES NOTES/LEGISLATION
 

 

LIFTING DOGS

 

THE GROOMER

HYDRAULIC TABLES TO AID LIFTING LARGE DOGS

CORRECT MANUAL HANDLING TRAINING

HIGH PLAN LARGE BREEDS ON SEPARATE DAYS TO PREVENT HEAVY LIFTING REPETITIVELY

HASAW ACT

MANUAL HANDLING OPERATIONS REGULATIONS

 

 

SLIPPING ON WET FLOOR

 

THE GROOMER

CLIENTS/VISITORS

MOP UP AN SPILLAGES AND USE WET FLOOR WARNING SIGNS

NON SLIP FLOORING

KEEP MOBILE PHONE TO HAND TO CALL FOR HELP IF NEEDED

HIGH

KEEP BATHING AND DRYING TO SET ZONES.

ON WET DAYS USE A WET FLOOR SIGN ALL DAY TO WARN CLIENTS

 

HASAW ACT

 

CUSTOMER CONFRONTATION/ AGGRESSION

THE GROOMER CCTV TO MONITOR ACTIVITY IN THE SALON.

LINK CCTV TO THIRD PARTY PHONE

DO NOT WORK ALONE LATE AT NIGHT

PANIC ALARMS

USE A DOORBELL SYSTEM SO CUSTOMERS/ VISITORS HAVE TO BE LET IN.

LOW EMERGENCY NUMBER SET ON MOBILE PHONE.

SIGNAGE REGARDING CCTV USE

SIGNATION REGARDING CUSTOMER VIOLENCE OR THREATENING BEHAVIOUR NOT BEING TOLERATED AND APPROPRIATE ACTION TAKEN STRAIGHT AWAY.

HASAW ACT

SUDDEN ILLNESS

THE GROOMER MOBILE PHONE TO CALL FOR HELP

UP TO DATE CLIENT RECORDS SO SOMEONE CAN INFORM OWNERS

LOW INSURE AN EMERGENCY CONTACT IS AVAILABLE FOR ALL DOGS.

KEEP A MEDICATION PACK TO TREAT COMMON ILLNESSES IN THE SALON

HASAW ACT

FIRST AID;

CUT / INJURY

THE GROOMER INSURE SUITABLE FIRST AID PROVISIONS

MOBILE PHONE TO CALL FOR HELP

STORE TOOLS CORRECTLY

MEDIUM USE SAFE WORKING PRACTICES AT ALL TIMES HASAW ACT
 

HAVING TO LEAVE SALON IN AN EMERGENCY

 

 

THE GROOMER

CLIENTS

INSURE YOU HAVE SOMEONE YOU CAN CONTACT TO STAY WITH CLIENTS IF NEEDED. EMERGENCY CONTACTS TO INFORM AN OWNER IF YOU HAVE HAD TO LEAVE SUDDENLY.

VET WHO WILL COME OUT TO SALON IF REQUIRED

LOW EMERGENCY CONTACT DETAILS DISPLAYED IN SALON WINDOW. ANIMAL WELFARE ACT
 

 

FATIGUE

 

THE GROOMER

PLAN CLIENTS CAREFULLY TO ENSURE THE DAY IS NOT REPETITIVE

USE ANTI FATIGUE MATS TO PREVENT TIRED LEGS

TAKE REGULAR BREAKS

HIGH

STICK TO NORMAL WORKING HOURS AND DO NOT OVERLOAD WORK SCHEDULE.

EMPLOY HELP FOR EXTRA BUSY PERIODS

HASAW ACT
 

 

HANDLING  AGGRESSIVE DOGS

 

 

 

 

THE GROOMER CARRY OUT CLIENT CONSULTATIONS TO FIND OUT TEMPERMENT ISSUES

USE APPROPRIATE HANDLING METHODS

USE APPROPRIATE RESTRAINTS

MEDIUM WATCH BODY LANGUAGE, USE A GROOMERS HELPER TO PREVENT SUDDEN BITES

DANGEROUS DOGS ACT

HASAW ACT

PPE

 

 

All salons should implement and maintain a fire prevention and management plan.

 

Adequate fire protection includes

 

  • risk assessment
  • fire extinguishers (carbon dioxide or powder, not water). Local fire authorities will assess premises and advise on requirements
  • appropriate signage. Signs should include exits clearly marked, fire precautions and a plan of the building showing exits. There should also be “No Smoking”       signs displayed inside the building.
  • staff trained in and able to use fire fighting equipment
  • regular drills or fire questionnaires to ensure all staff are informed of the correct procedure in case of fire
  • fire fighting equipment checked and serviced annually and a certificate of compliance displayed in a prominent position
  • emergency numbers displayed
  • fire assembly point clearly marked
  • correct storage of combustible materials
  • Dogs which may be present in the building must also be taken into account. A secure outside fenced area with provision for tethering dogs can keep them safe from harm that may be caused by running loose or fighting.

 

 

 

PPE is defined in the Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations as:

‘All equipment (including clothing affording protection against the weather) which is intended to be worn or held by a person at work which protects them against one or more risks to their health and safety’.

 

This equipment in a Grooming Salon includes:

 

Aprons, Grooming Jacket, Rubber Gloves, Goggles/Face Mask, Sound mufflers/Noise Reducers

 

 

COSHH is a method of protecting all of the people present in any one area (employees, employers, trainees, general public, representatives of firms) from the effects of many harmful substances including

 

  • Chemicals
  • Dust
  • Fumes
  • Micro-organisms

 

By preventing and controlling the risk of exposure which can cause adverse effects such as:

  • Respiratory disease (e.g. obstructive pulmonary disease)
  • Skin problems (e.g. dermatitis, eczema)
  • Zoonosis (e.g. lymes disease, ringworm).
  • Harmful substances can enter the body in several ways. They can be:
  • Absorbed (through contact with the skin)
  • Ingested (by swallowing)
  • Inhaled (by breathing)

 

 

Potential Hazards in the Salon – Whilst working with or caring for animals, a person may come into contact with or handle many different substances which are hazardous to health and therefore care should be taken to follow safe practices.

  • Dust, hair, scurf & micro-organisms
  • Veterinary prescribed shampoos and lotions
  • Insecticidal Shampoos & Products
  • Cleaning Products

 

There are several different warning signs commonly used to denote chemical hazard categories.

Each product used in the grooming salon should be accompanied by a Safety Data Sheet. A supply company which cannot supply a Data Sheet to its customers may be in breach of the law. All Data Sheets should be kept together in a prominent place to which there is easy access if necessary. If someone accidentally drinks blade cleaner, a Data Sheet will tell the exact way to deal with the situation before being able to get to a doctor.

 

 

This legislation covers electrical safety in the workplace and compliance is the responsibility of both the employer and the employee. All wiring and equipment should be sound, competently installed and maintained, preferably by a qualified electrician.

 

Portable Appliance Testing (PAT Testing)

 

All electrical equipment which is either over one year old or not covered by a manufacturers guarantee should be tested annually. This test is done by specialist electricians and checks the electrical and physical safety and condition of the equipment. All equipment checked is labelled and dated and a certificate issued to verify compliance. Everything from clippers to kettle to Christmas tree lights need to be checked. A list of all electrical equipment present and each item’s status should be kept. Equipment that fails the PAT testing should be taken out of use until it is repaired.

 

Changing plugs

 

Any damaged or cracked plugs should be replaced or the equipment taken out of use. Changing a plug is relatively simple but you should not do this if you are not sure how to do it safely.

 

 

There is a fuse between the live terminal and the live pin. The fuse breaks the circuit if too much current flows. If you have to replace a fuse, make sure that the replacement is the same rating (e.g. 3A, 5A or 13A) as the fuse removed.

 

The diagram shows the key features of a correctly wired three-pin mains plug.

 

 

There is an easy way to remember where each wire goes.

 

Take the SECOND letter of the colour of the wire

i.e. bLue, bRown and sTriped

Looking down on the plug,

BLUE goes LEFT

BROWN goes RIGHT and

STRIPED goes TOP

 

The Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 require employers to provide adequate and appropriate equipment, facilities and personnel to ensure their employees receive immediate attention if they are injured or taken ill at work. These Regulations apply to all workplaces including those with less than five employees and to the self-employed

 

Good working practices and safe control methods will minimise risk to both the groomer and the dog, Accidents do happen though and it is important that you are equipped to deal with this type of situation. It is valuable to attend both human and canine First Aid training courses.

 

It is compulsory to have an Accident Book and details of all accidents occurring in the salon, however minor, should be filled in and filed.

 

A First Aid kit is also compulsory. There is no standard list of items required for a First Aid Box as much of what you will need depends on the risks present. As a guide, and where there are no special requirements, a minimum list would be

 

  • A leaflet giving general guidance (HSE leaflet – Basic Advice On First Aid at Work)
  • 20 individually wrapped sterile adhesive dressings (assorted sizes)
  • 2 sterile eye pads
  • 4 individually wrapped triangular bandages (preferably sterile)
  • 6 safety pins
  • 6 medium (approx. 12cm x 12cm) individually wrapped sterile unmedicated wound dressings
  • 2 large (approx. 18cm x 18cm) individually wrapped sterile unmedicated wound dressings
  • one pair disposable gloves

 

N.B. First Aid kits should not contain any tablets or medicines.

 

 

 

Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013

 

Known as RIDDOR, these regulations require employers, the self-employed and people in control of premises, to report work-related deaths, major injuries, work-related diseases and dangerous occurrences.

 

Incidents can be reported:

  • to the Incident Contact Centre by telephone on 0845 300 9923
  • online via the HSE’s RIDDOR report webpages (external site).The HSE’s RIDDOR pages give detailed information about the requirements of the regulations, what should be reported, and statistics gathered from RIDDOR incident reports.

 

Accident Book

 

Details of all incidents, injuries and dangerous occurrences must be recorded in an accident book. A new version of the accident book was introduced in 2003 to ensure compliance with the Data Protection Act 1998.

Anyone employing staff must comply with employment legislation. Major pieces of legislation that you must be aware of include:

 

  • The National Minimum Wage Act
  • The Working Time Regulations
  • The Employment Rights Act
  • You can get many helpful booklets on employment issues from your local Jobcentre.
  • The employment section of the Business Link website includes information and guidance on all aspects of employment legislation. Information for businesses in Northern Ireland isavailable on the NI Business Info website.
  • There is also some guidance on employment legislation available on the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS) website. 

 

The Equality Act came into force on 1 October 2010. The Equality Act brings together over 116 separate pieces of legislation into one single Act. Combined, they make up a new Act that provides a legal framework to protect the rights of individuals and advance equality of opportunity for all.

 

The nine main pieces of legislation that have merged are:

 

  • Equal Pay Act 1970
  • Sex Discrimination Act 1975
  • Race Relations Act 1976
  • Disability Discrimination Act 1995
  • Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations 2003
  • Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2003
  • Employment Equality (Age) Regulations 2006
  • Equality Act 2006, Part 2
  • Equality Act (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2007

 

 

The insurance that employers must take out is referred to as Employer’s Liability Compulsory Insurance (ECL1). As well as being insured, employers must post details of the insurance for staff to see. This requirement applies to most companies; exemptions include public organisations and certain micro companies.

 

All groomers should have insurance. There is very little chance that you would get through an entire grooming career without a mishap of some sort. At the very minimum insurance should cover:

 

  • Public liability (e.g. a client slips and falls on your premises)
  • Employers insurance (if relevant)
  • Insurance to cover any accidental damage to dogs (veterinary treatment, death)
  • Contents insurance (your equipment will be worth a substantial amount).


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